All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services

All Clear Title 5 Inspection!

Watch this great video by Kate Lanagan MacGregor from BOLD Moves Real Estate as a technician from All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services performs a Title V Inspection.

All Clear Septic Services performs a detailed and  thorough MA  Title V Inspection.  All of the septic system covers are opened prior to the inspection.  The technician begins by measuring the grade depth of all covers.  The measurement is taken from the top of the tank to the soil surface.  Next the condition of the inlet and outlet pipes is assessed.  The overall liquid level is checked and measurements of the solids at the bottom of the tank and the scum layer at the top are taken.

Next is the evaluation of the condition of the distribution box.  Waste water from the tank is very corrosive and runs through the distribution box.  Over time the concrete may break down due to the corrosive nature of the liquid running through it.  The addition of a filter on the outlet pipe of the tank and/or the addition of a vent on the distribution box are very beneficial in preserving the life of this component.

How can you help prevent this?  Risers installed to bring the tank covers to grade can help.  Having covers to grade makes a routine maintenance program easier.  Instituting a routine maintenance program is very important for the overall health of your septic system.

Luckily for the homeowner in this video, this system passed.  Let us help you develop a routine maintenance program so you will pass your MA Title 5 Inspection.

Visit www.allclearseptic.com for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://https://youtu.be/8A5pIW6p0Achttp://https://youtu.be/8A5pIW6p0Ac

Septic Preservation Services

How do you keep your septic tank risers out of sight?

How do you keep your septic tank risers out of sight?

Septic Preservation Services Van on a Service Call
If you have had your septic system outfitted with the proper septic tank risers, you most likely have a cover sitting in the middle of your garden, lawn or somewhere unsightly. Keeping these covers easily accessible is important, but that doesn’t mean you have to put a sign on them! Hiding these risers is very simple and easy, and can be done without getting in the way of someone servicing your system.

The simplest way is to just put a light fake stone or decorative item on the cover. The key here is to keep it light, you don’t want to damage your system and the service company can pump the system as needed. A lighthouse, light birdbath or other decorative lawn ornament is an easy way to keep that riser out of sight!

Another way is to plant small plants around it. This will effectively camouflage the cover from most people. Keep in mind that should anyone need to access the tank, the plants may get in the way so be sure to leave space somewhere so the septic crew can get to the tank unhindered.

Rock features or stepping stones are another great way to keep the cover out of sight. Placing these around the cover with some light decorative item over the cover itself is a great way to hide the riser. It also may be a way to ad a nice decorative piece to your lawn!

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call Septic Preservation Services at 877-378-4279!
Septic Preservation Services

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services, Title 5 Inspections

What are risers, and why should I have them on my septic system?

What are risers, and why should I have them on my septic system?

Enclosed septic system with risers used by Septic Preservation Services

Enclosed septic system used by Septic Preservation Services

Risers on a septic system are the access points through which a person servicing your septic system can see inside the tank.  In the image below you see the three tubes rising from the top of the system.  Those are the risers.  The top is generally put at ground level for easiest access.  Some systems do not have risers built into them.  When there are no risers present, anyone trying service the system will have to resort to digging holes in the yard to find the access points to the tank. In some cases it is necessary to bring in excavation equipment if the ground proves too difficult to dig by hand.

If you are given the option to add risers to your system, it would be beneficial to anyone servicing the system in the future if you made sure they are put into place before the system is covered over.  Your servicemen will thank you, especially if you call All-Clear Septic & Wastewater Services to inspect or service your tank!

 

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services at 508-763-4431!

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services - title V walkthrough

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services, Title 5 Inspections

Massachusetts Title V complete video and whitepaper now available!

You can now see a page by page overview of the entire Massachusetts Title V Septic Inspection form narrated by Al Rivet of All-Clear Septic & Wastewater Services!

Al walks you through the entire inspection form, ensuring you understand every single word!

You can view the entire library here: http://allclearseptic.com/education-videos/

here is the video:

here is the downloadable whitepaper overview link: All-Clear Septic overview of Massachusetts Title V Inspection Form

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services at 508-763-4431!

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services - title V walkthrough

Septic Preservation Services

Anaerobic New Compact Septic System by Septic Preservation Services

Anaerobic Septic System

A new Anaerobic Septic System to be installed by Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services prepares a new compact septic system for installation!

This new septic system for a residential installation is small, self-contained and easy to install!

The most commonly installed unit has a very small footprint of only 8′ x 4’2″ and does not require a septic tank unless local regulations call for it. This unit is designed to be installed in a number of situations including those with very tight space tolerances! This medium sized unit can treat a property with up to 6 bedrooms.

Septic Preservation Services

Inside an Anaerobic Septic System by Septic Preservation Services

To the right is a peek inside the unit, showcasing not only the expected chambers for sedimentation, which you would see in a traditional septic tank, but also two anaerobic filter chambers. The first chamber is designed for nitrate denitrification, which means it uses bacteria to convert the ammonia into nitrate, which then passes to the second chamber and is converted again into nitrite. This process enables waste water and solids to be processed and passed to the soil absorption system or holding tank. You can also see build in risers which make maintaining and pumping this unit a breeze!

All Clear Septic and Septic Preservation Services has the solution to any of your septic issues. Call Us Toll Free at 877-378-4279 today so we can solve your septic problems!

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services, Title 5 Inspections

Part 4 – Al Rivet walks through Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Septic Inspection Form

Al Rivet with All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services walks through the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection Form – Part 4

Do you have questions about the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection form?  Do you have a septic inspection pending?  Al Rivet from All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services takes us through the 17 page document line by line, highlighting the sections which may cause confusion or need further explanation.

Al’s review  continues on page 14 with his review of the various components of the septic system, and the importance of maintaining them properly.  He details information required for sections including the Pump Chamber, Soil Absorption System and less commonly used items as Cesspools and Privies, or an outhouse.  The Soil Absorption System is reviewed thoroughly as it can have the significant impact on the local ecology if it is put in too close to a water source.

Page 15 is a diagram of the system from above, with the nearest landmarks included.  This is to enable anyone working on the system to find the portion they want to check with as few holes as possible.  Al recommends adding risers to the septic tank to allow easy access without the need for heavy equipment and digging.  It is also used to ensure any new construction is not placed on or near critical components of the existing septic system.

Next is an in-depth review of the inspectors assessment of nearby bodies of water, wells or other sources of usable water.  This is necessary to ensure the septic system has no impact on potential drinking water sources and to prevent contamination of the local environment.  The bottom of the page requires a written description of how these tests were conducted for approval reviews and to re-conduct the tests if needed in the same manner.

Finally there is a simple checklist on which the inspector validates they have completed each section.

Watch Al take you through the end of the Massachusetts Title V Inspection form below!

 

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services at 508-763-4431!

 

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services, Title 5 Inspections

Part 3 – Al Rivet walks through Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Septic Inspection Form

Al Rivet with All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services walks through the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection Form – Part 3

Do you have questions about the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection form?  Do you have a septic inspection pending?  Al Rivet from All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services takes us through the 17 page document line by line, highlighting the sections which may cause confusion or need further explanation.

Al continues his review on page 8 which asks for details on pumping records of the septic system.  These records can be obtained from the local health department as the pumping company is required to provide the health department with information every time your system is pumped out.  This is another key indicator of the health of the septic system showing if it has been taken care of properly of not.  It also is required to show the system has not been pumped within the two weeks previous to the inspection, which will prevent the inspector from seeing the system under normal usage.

The next section asks for information regarding the type of system being used.  Most conventional systems consist of a  septic tank, distribution box and soil absorption system, but there are other systems which consist of cesspools, a shared system or some other new or innovative technology.  The age of the septic is asked for as well as the current contents of the tank, how full it is and if that level is acceptable or not.  Al recommends adding risers to the tank for ease of access as well as a filter to ensure the system is not clogged.

Tight tanks are discussed next, which are a septic tank without an outlet in an area where a soil absorption system is not safely usable.  This may be on a beach or area with a high water table or other situation where a soil absorption area is not possible.  He goes into more detail about distributions boxes and the health of a septic system based on the health of the distribution box.

View the video below to get the full review of pages 8 through 13 of the Massachusetts Title V Septic Inspection Form by Al Rivet of All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services!

 

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services at 508-763-4431!

 

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services, Title 5 Inspections

Part 2 – Al Rivet walks through Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Septic Inspection Form

Al Rivet with All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services walks through the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection Form – Part 2

Do you have questions about the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection form?  Do you have a septic inspection pending?  Al Rivet from All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services takes us through the 17 page document line by line, highlighting the sections which may cause confusion or need further explanation.

In part two of his overview of the form, he begins with a request that you read the form in detail, as you go along with this video if you so desire.   He then goes into detail regarding the failure criteria, including one of the most common failure reasons being part of the soil absorption system below the groundwater high level.  This is to ensure the system does not contaminate the local groundwater or well.

Large systems for condominiums or other businesses is the next subject, with flows between 10,000 and 15,000 gallons per day.  This is mentioned to be sure the system capacity is sufficient for the water used by the business or living space.   There are different criteria for the septic system which must be taken into account to pass due to size, capacity and space needed for the soil absorption system.

The top of page six begins the checklist identifying the current state of the septic system.  It requires the inspector to note all aspects of the system including pumping records, plan inspections and any record of recent maintenance to the system.  These pieces of information will give the inspector a better understanding of the system’s health.

The bottom of page six and all of page seven are dedicated to the current conditions under which the septic system is being used.  The number of bedrooms the system was designed for compared to the actual number of bedrooms is first, and quite important.  A healthy system is designed to handle at minimum the total number of bedrooms in the dwelling, if not more.   If there are more bedrooms than the system was designed for there could be significant flow issues and the possibility of contaminating the ground water.  Other pieces of information noted are laundry or garbage grinder usage, seasonal living and any water meter readings if they are available.

Lastly on page 7 are conditions if the system if for commercial or industrial usage, with technical information regarding the system design and usage being listed.

Watch the video below as Al Rivet walks you through this portion of the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Septic Inspection Form!

 

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services at 508-763-4431!

 

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services, Title 5 Inspections

Al Rivet walks through Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Septic Inspection Form

Al Rivet with All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services walks through the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection Form Part 1.

 

Do you have questions about the Massachusetts Title V ( Title 5 ) Inspection form?  Do you have a septic inspection pending?  Al Rivet from All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services takes us through the 17 page document line by line, highlighting the sections which may cause confusion or need further explanation.

The top of page 1 from the form details the property location and the inspector’s qualifications.  This portion is key as it indicates exactly who is handling the inspection and their state-issued license information.  This is good to have in the event there is some issue in the future or you need a second inspection after completing any upgrades or alterations to the existing system.

The bottom of page 1 and page two detail the status of the system after the inspection.  It can Pass, Conditionally Pass, Fail or require further  Evaluation by the Local Approving Authority.     A passed inspection requires just a check in the box and any comments the inspector feels necessary to add.  A “Conditionally passed” inspection requires the owner to perform some manner of work on the system in order to fully pass, but it is not enough to fail the system.  A “Fail” inspection means the system requires replacement, repair or significant work to bring it up to code.  A “Further Evaluation is Required by the Board of Health” inspection is to ensure the system meets local regulations regarding system location and proximity to drinking water, wells or other wetlands in an effort to prevent environmental contamination.

Below is a video of Al Rivet discussing these points at length!

 

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services at 508-763-4431!

 

All Clear Septic & Wastewater Services Title V Inspection

Do's and Don'ts

How to Keep Your Massachusets Septic System in Great Shape During the Holidays

septic-system-holidaysThe holidays are usually a time for overindulgence. In fact, more Americans gain weight in the time period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s each year due to all of the holiday meals, parties, cookies and other sweet treats that always seem to get handed out this time of year. Unfortunately you are not alone. If you are the proud owner of a septic system then you are hopefully well aware of the toll that the holidays can take on it if you are not prepared.

Step One: Get Your Septic System Inspected

Before the holidays even begin, it is in your best interest to get your septic system inspected by a licensed and certified professional to make sure that it is in good working order. This should be done before cold weather arrives in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, before the ground freezes and before your house is filled with tons of toilet-flushing guests.

When You Get Your Septic System Inspected…

Your service technician will check to see how full the septic tank is and make sure that it is processing waste properly. The drain or leach field will also be checked to make sure it isn’t blocked in any way and that it is processing the liquid the way that it should. If it is necessary, the technician will pump and maintain the system, making any required repairs during the visit or on a future visit. Tell your technician how many guests you are expecting and ask whether or not your septic system can handle that many guests. Through routine septic system pumping this should not be an issue, but it never hurts to ask a professional just to be sure.

Step Two: Pump and Maintain Your Septic System

One of the best things that a homeowner can do is to get on a Preventative Maintenance Program with their septic system service company. However, if you have not had your septic system inspected or pumped in a long time, anytime is a good time to call for service. A professional technician will help you to pump and maintain your septic system year-round, but the time for routine pumping is now before you end up dealing with a septic system emergency.

Step Three: Know What to Look For

When it comes to owning a home with a septic system, it is important that you know what to look for with regard to signs or signals that your septic system might be having problems. You shouldn’t experience a failure if you get your system inspected annually and sign up for routine septic system pumping, but you should still know the signs of system failure.

Pay attention to your septic system and watch for the following signs:

  • slow pipes
  • gurgling pipes
  • an odor in the house or outside near the leach field
  • a puddling or pooling in the yard

Step Four: Train Your Family

Everyone who lives in your house should know the rules of good septic care by now. If not, now is the time to teach them. Knowing not to flush any items other than toilet paper down the commode will help prevent some of the most common problems associated with septic system care. If you and your children know the rules of septic system care, chances are they will share that with any guests that might visit for the holidays.

7 Things You Should NEVER Do If You Own a Septic System

#1 – never add bacterial additives to your septic system, always contact a professional

#2 – never allow your guests to park their cars over the drain or leach field, rope it off if you need to in order to keep it clear

#3 – never dump grease down the drain, pour hot grease into an old metal coffee can and wipe pans out with a paper towel

#4 – never use a garbage disposal without clearing it with your septic system technician first to make sure your system can handle its use

#5 – never put trash down drains or in toilets including feminine hygiene products, diapers, cigarette butts, paper towels, toilet paper that isn’t approved for septic system use, coffee grounds and filters

#6 – never pour chemicals down drains as they will kill the “good bacteria” that breaks down waste in your septic system, this includes cleaners, paint thinner, gasoline, oil, pesticides and other known pollutants

#7 – never be embarrassed to tell guests about basic septic care, it will save you from costly septic system emergency care and repair

Step Five: Talk to Your Guests

Don’t be ashamed to talk with your guests about proper septic care. Only 20 percent of Americans use a septic system for the treatment of wastewater, so chances are your guests might not even know anything about good septic care. Remind them not to use the toilet as a trash can and to limit the length and frequency of showers if they are staying over during the holidays. Tell guests not to stick food items or grease in your sink, a well-meaning guest who attempts to do the dishes for you might end up causing a costly septic system emergency.

Face the Truth About the Holidays

The more that you understand as a homeowner about the strain that the holidays can put on your septic system, the better you will be able to avoid costly repairs. Routine septic system pumping will help keep everything running smoothly and you should consider adding a Preventative Maintenance Program that will ensure that your septic system is inspected by a licensed and certified professional. If you remember to pump and maintain your septic system all year round, you can avoid costly septic system emergency calls during the busy holiday season.

All-Clear Septic & Wastewater works in all types of weather and in every season of the year. However, it is important to pump and maintain your septic system through regular inspections and routine septic system pumping based on the size of your tank and the number of people living in your household. All-Clear can help get you on the path to healthy septic system maintenance and care, making sure that all of your holiday entertaining isn’t ruined by a septic system emergency.

If you suspect that your septic system has failed or is getting ready to fail in any way, contact All-Clear right away for immediate service. Owning a septic system doesn’t have to be a huge inconvenience or a big expense. Making sure that you pump and maintain your septic system year-round and learning all you can about proper use and care will make a big difference in the way you feel about it. Contact All-Clear today to get your septic system inspected or to set up an appointment to schedule routine septic system pumping.